• What does quality ECE look like?

    100% qualified teaching staff

    Research shows that high quality ECE centres have a stable staff of trained and qualified teachers. Qualified teachers know how to help children progress, can respond to their interests and improve their skills.

    The government dropped the target of achieving 100% qualified and registered ECE teachers in 2009. It now only requires services to employ 50%, and funds onl yup to 80%.

    NZEI wants the target of 100% qualified teachers mandated and funding to support that to be reinstated.

  • What does quality ECE look like?

    Good adult to child ratios

    Children do best when they form strong bonds with adults who know them well and have plenty of time to play and interact with them individually and in groups, especially babies and toddlers.

    The government pledged in 2008 to reduce adult:child ratios for children under two to 1:4.

    NZEI wants the 1:4 ratio implemented immediately and a ratio of 1:8 for children over two introduced.

  • What does quality ECE look like?

    Small group sizes

    Size counts. Many children are comfortable and can learn more in small groups. Often teachers find small groups make it easier to respond to children as individuals.

    The government has increased the maximum size of ECE centres from 50 to 150 children over two, and up to 25 children under 2.

    Most quality centres currently provide a maximum of 15 under 2s and 40 over 2s.

  • What does quality ECE look like?

    Relationships

    Positive interactions between teachers and children and between teachers, children and their families are vital. Quality services encourage parents and whanau to be involved in children's learning. Positive relationships lay the foundation for responsive and personalised learning for all children.
    NZEI wants the target of 100% qualified teachers mandated and funding to support that to be reinstated.

  • What does quality ECE look like?

    A warm and welcoming learning environment

    ECE environments need to offer warmth and predictability for both childrenand whanau. At the same time children need learning experiences that are stimulating and challenging, providing opportunities for children’s knowledge and understanding to be extended and deepened.
    NZEI wants the government to acknowledge that responsive learning environments require investment.

  • What does quality ECE look like?

     

    100% qualified teaching staff

    Good adult to child ratios

    Small group sizes

    Relationships

    A warm and welcoming learning environment

Recent Posts

  • Submission on the provision of ECE services

    On December 8, NZEI Te Riu Roa delivered a submission to the Productivity Commission addressing the provision of ECE services in Aotearoa. The Productivity Commission outlined their inquiry into the provision of a broad range of social services in June 2014. The outline specifically included Early Childhood Education in this inquiry. The goal of the […]

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  • The Kindergarten Journey

    My son was just two-and-a-half years old when he started kindergarten. On his first day, I wondered how my baby would cope being away from me for the first time. I hung around outside for half an hour after dropping him off, half expecting a phone call, before dragging myself away. I rang at lunchtime […]

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  • Gingerbread men and ECE

    I’ve discovered a link between gingerbread men and the long term positive impacts of quality ECE.  Seriously.  As I watched my 13 year old, 10 year old and 7 year old kids and their three friends of similar ages all poring over dough and cutters on the weekend, I was transported back to to those […]

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